Eat That Frog, by Brian Tracy

Eat That Frog, by Brian Tracy

If you feel like you're drowning, Eat That Frog feels like a lifeguard coming to the rescue - and teaching you how to surf your way back to shore!
When you get right to the heart of most business productivity books, it all comes down to procrastination. All of your "Getting Things Done" and Stephen Covey methods are all just a means to break your procrastination habit. In which case, I think it's well worth while to go straight to a book which addresses the problem head on. Subtitled "21 Great Ways To Stop Procrastinating and Get More Done in Less Time," Eat That Frog is dedicated to giving you the kick in the pants that you (if you are like 98% of humanity) probably need.
 
Make no mistake: this book is boot camp. It doesn't coddle the reader, lead you gently to conclusions, or lavish you with testimonials and "Diane is facing a big project" mini-stories that are the convention in other productivity books. Tracy just lays it out: 21 ways to identify what you need to do, and which order you need to do it in. 

In many ways, this book is refreshing. I appreciate the overall lack of jargon, although I got a little queasy every time he drops a frog-eating reference. It's gross, but it gets your attention in a way a lot of the other, more touchy-feely books do not.
 
Like all great concepts. Eat That Frog's method seems obvious in hindsight. Put simply, you list all your activities for the day, week, month, and year. Then prioritize those tasks. Which ones do you have to do, or else something genuinely dire will happen? And at the other end of the spectrum, which tasks don't REALLY need to be done at all?
 
Then do your tasks in order of priority. End of story.
 
In my case, the book pegged me right off as being one of those people who can flit around endlessly doing the small, easy, yet meaningless tasks - while putting off the difficult, high-value tasks until the very end. This is not a non-judgmental book. In fact, in places it is very judgmental. Tracy calls people who get stuck in this pattern "losers." What can I say? The truth hurts.
 
Eat That Frog can seem a bit off-putting at times. But it's like medicine: it doesn't always taste good, but sometimes you need it. I would wholeheartedly recommend this book for anyone else who could use some motivation, or who feels overwhelmed by all the millions of tasks that seem to bury us on a day to day basis. If you feel like you're drowning, Eat That Frog feels like a lifeguard coming to the rescue - and teaching you how to surf your way back to shore!